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The Bishop Strachan School Heritage

“Remember girls, you are not going home to be selfish butterflies of fashion. The Bishop Strachan School has been endeavouring to fit you to become useful and courageous women. I believe you will yet see our universities open to women. Work out your freedom, girls! Knowledge is now no more a fountain seal’d; drink deep.”



- Mrs. Anne Thomson, Lady Principal 1872-75

Preserving the Past

The BSS Museum & Archives is home to valuable photographs, artifacts, uniforms, letters, artwork and publications that have been written by or for the school over the years. These treasures offer a fascinating glimpse into the talents, thoughts and experiences of those from generations past. In honour of our 150th, we have put an online exhibit together featuring multi-media and digitized pages of archival (and very delicate) documents to allow for greater access. Enjoy!

Table of Contents

  • A Brief History of BSS (Video)
  • The Bishop Strachan School Long History
  • Lasting Legacy Profiles
    • Viola ALLEN 1878
    • Maud EDGAR 1888
    • Harriet FORD 1878
    • Emily FERGUSON Murphy 1885
    • Miriam GREEN Ellis 1896
    • Violet NESBITT 1895
    • Elsie MONTIZAMBERT 1893
    • Daisy POCOCK 1888
    • Marjorie PICKETHALL 1901
    • Mary E. WRINCH 1892
  • 1869 Prospectus
  • 1882 Jane COLDWELL Album
  • 1889 Maud OXNARD Album
  • 1904 BSS Magazine | Easter
  • 1904 BSS Magazine | Christmas
  • 1905 BSS Magazine | Easter
  • 1905 BSS Magazine | Midsummer
  • 1909 The BSS Song
  • 1917 BSS Magazine | Midsummer
  • 1927 BSSA Bulletin | June
  • 1928 BSSA Bulletin | June
  • 1939 BSSA Bulletin | Summer
  • 1940 Prospectus
  • 1958 Prospectus
  • Jubilee Record 1867-1927
  • Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943
  • Drama Photographs & Programmes 1915-1964
  • WW2 BSS Veterans

BSS Long History

JOHN LANGTRY: THE MOVING SPIRIT

The origins of The Bishop Strachan School date to 1865 when Rev. John Langtry, responding to concerns about the education of girls, proposed at Diocesan Synod that a committee be struck to consider establishing a Church School for girls. The school would provide strong academic and religious training at a reasonable price. At this time, it was considered that good education for girls was only available at expensive private schools or in convent schools run by the Roman Catholic Church. The former were financially out of reach for the middle class, and the latter were suspected of trying to convert Anglican girls.

The Synod committee did not act, but Rev. Langtry assembled a group of men as a provisional committee and persevered. Due largely to Langtry’s determination, the school opened its doors September 12, 1867 on the premises of “Pinehurst”, a property located adjacent to the present Art Gallery of Ontario. It had previously been occupied by a fashionable and expensive school for girls, Mrs. Forster’s School, which had recently closed down. For one year it served as a ready-made, if inadequate, base of operation for BSS’s first 31 students: 21 day students and 10 boarders.

The following excerpt from the first Bishop Strachan School prospectus indicates Langtry’s key educational objectives: the school would offer to girls a curriculum equivalent “with that of first class schools” with an “emphasis on subjects that would develop the understanding, strengthen the judgment, and refine the taste.” As a Church School it was also designed to instruct pupils in the doctrines of the Church of England and prepare its students “for the serious duties of life, as members or heads of families” (1869 Prospectus). Although the intention was primarily to educate the daughters of Anglican families, the school was “open to all” families who were “willing to conform to its regulations.” The school was named in honour of Toronto’s first Anglican Bishop, John Strachan, who died some six weeks after the school opened.

The first Course of Study would have prepared the students for university entrance, even though women were not admitted to the University of Toronto until the fall of 1884, and to Trinity University (now Trinity College) for lectures and eligibility for degrees until 1886. The curriculum of 1869 included Religious Instruction (Scripture, History, Church History, Catechism), History, Italian, French, German, English (Grammar, Composition and Literature), Arithmetic, Natural Philosophy, Natural Science, Latin, Music (Instrumental and Vocal), Drawing, Dancing, Calisthenics and Domestic Economy.

BSS Long History | TOC

1868-1914: NEW LOCATIONS AND GROWING ENROLMENT

In 1868, the year of its incorporation by the first Parliament of the Province of Ontario, the school moved to John Strachan’s former home on Front Street, and the overflow made good use of Captain Strachan’s cottage, connected to the main residence by a covered walkway. A year-and-a-half later these premises were also inadequate, and a second move was made to College and Yonge where the school stayed for the next 45 years. Wykeham Lodge was the former home of Sir James Buchanan Macaulay and stood on grounds, which included the site later occupied by Eaton’s College Street store, now College Park. The school’s new building was renamed Wykeham Hall, although the names “The Church School” or “Bishop Strachan School” were also employed. College Avenue itself was little more than a lane leading to the University of Toronto grounds with toll gates at the Yonge Street end. In this pastoral setting, BSS girls were free to ramble on Saturday afternoon, gathering violets or strawberries as they passed.

From the outset, the pursuit of academic excellence was strongly encouraged, in company with a thorough religious training. A comment attributed to Mrs. Anne Thomson (Lady Principal 1872-75) sums up the philosophy of the school during those early years:

“Remember girls, you are not going home to the selfish butterflies of fashion. The Bishop Strachan School has been endeavouring to fit you to become useful and courageous women. I believe you will yet see our universities open to woman. Work out your freedom, girls! Knowledge is now no more a fountain seal’d; drink deep.”

While the Wykeham Hall surroundings were idyllic, enrolment began to drop when the school moved north. Amidst serious financial problems, thought was given to liquidation. However, the crisis was averted through the concerted efforts of Miss Rose Grier, Lady Principal (1876-1899), and the School Council. They raised $10,000 (a considerable figure at that time), and in 1880 the school’s position was solidified by the sale of a portion of its property.

Under the guidance of Miss Grier, and her successor, Miss Helen Acres (appointed 1899) the position of BSS as a first-rate academic institution was consolidated. The Prospectus of 1898-99 laid out an ambitious curriculum. Courses taken by students in Form V, the penultimate year, are representative: they included English Language and Literature, British and Canadian History, Mathematics (Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry and Physics) French, German, Latin, Ancient History and optional courses of Drawing, Physical Culture (physical education) and elocution. From this late nineteenth century period came the earliest BSS students to graduate from university – Ethel Middleton (B.A. 1890, M.A. 1903) and Sarah Nation (B.A. 1891, M.A. 1904), both from Trinity University (now Trinity College, University of Toronto). Sarah Nation later returned to BSS to teach and to be Vice-Principal until her retirement in 1917. A steady stream of BSS students followed Middleton and Nation on to nursing schools and university in the 1890s and 1910s.

BSS Long History

In 1904, another BSS graduate, Emily Ferguson Murphy was named an Officer of the Juvenile Court in Alberta and later became the first woman Police Magistrate in the British Empire. An outspoken advocate of women’s rights, she was later one of the “Famous Five” responsible for effecting a change in the British North America Act in order that women be considered “persons” and thereby become eligible for seats in the Senate.

The school enrolment was a healthy 145 in 1890-91 and academic fees remained relatively modest at $18.00 a term for senior students with board and laundry at $45.00 a term between 1885 and 1898. Sports became increasingly important to the students. Early BSS students had riding lessons and played croquet, and later lawn tennis, basketball, and ice hockey were added. The school’s first Sports Day was held in 1906 and heralded the beginning of a long-standing tradition at BSS – the opportunity to participate in various athletic activities within the school and extramurally.

1915: MOVING NORTH

By the turn of the century, both the City of Toronto and the school were expanding rapidly. Wykeham Hall, once on the outskirts of the city, was now downtown, and, despite two additions and several modifications, the school had outgrown its facilities. Briefly, BSS operated a satellite school in Parkdale, but it closed in 1904. When Miss Harriet Walsh arrived as the new Headmistress (1911-1930) she faced a crowded school; by 1913-4 there were 252 students, one quarter of them boarders.

The Council’s search for a more suitable site eventually led to the current Lonsdale property. In 1913, a long retired Rose Grier turned the sod at a ceremony marking the start of a new era in the life of the school. After two years of construction, the girls and staff moved into the brand new, purpose-built school, designed in Collegiate Gothic style by the architects Sproatt & Rolph and built of grey stone with leaded windows.

A Chapel, part of the original plan, had to be delayed because of its expense and the First World War, but by 1926 a magnificent neo-Gothic building, largely a gift of the Old Girls of the school in memory of Miss Rose Grier, had been built and dedicated. For over 90 years it has contributed immeasurably to the school’s atmosphere and traditions.

The First World War made its impact on the school from the losses of fathers and brothers, to the extensive sewing and knitting campaigns of the students to the small plane that landed one day on the Lower Field to the number of alumnae (Old Girls) involved in the war effort. To date, 38 BSS Old Girls have been identified as WWI nurses or VADs, with many others working in munitions factories, farming activities or various other services.

BSS Long History | TOC

1920-1962: EVOLVING INSTITUTION

BSS in the 1920s to 1960s was a well-established girls’ school, with increasingly rigorously trained teachers, and attracting both the daughters of Old Girls, and day and boarding students new to the community. Its students enjoyed an extensive athletic programme, competing with the other major girls’ schools in basketball, tennis, field hockey, lacrosse, ice hockey, and had opportunities for skiing and swimming. The school prided itself on the post-secondary achievements of its graduates. The first BSS students to enter the professions of law and medicine achieved their qualifications in the 1920s and by the 1940s the majority of students graduating from the school were heading off to university.

When Miss Margaret Lowe (1930-1948), a former student, took over as Headmistress the school once again needed space. The original plan for a junior wing was resurrected, and, in 1933, it opened, providing Junior School classrooms and more residence space. By 1939, the requirements of the Physical Education department were such that the originally generous facilities were no longer adequate. After structural changes were made, a new pool was built beneath the Great Hall, a space still used for Physical Education. Until senior matriculation became a requirement for University entrance, few students required Physics and Chemistry, but the number climbed steadily, and in 1944 a modern Physics laboratory was outfitted to supplement the existing Chemistry lab.

Junior School Opening 1933
College Heights New Chapel 1927
College Heights Building 1915
Turning of the sod for College Heights 1913
Wykeham Hall 1888

BSS Long History

The Depression had ushered in a period of financial hardship, and when the Second World War followed quickly, its sufferings too touched BSS. In 1939, the school learned that three of its teachers were aboard a torpedoed civilian ship and that Miss Dorothy Hutchings had been killed in the attack. Students at BSS rallied to the war effort by fundraising for air raid victims, knitting, conducting paper and metal drives and purchasing war stamps. More than 160 Old Girls are identified as joining the Women’s Divisions of the three services or becoming members of the auxiliary services. BSS also hosted a significant number of UK war guests and, when they returned home after the war, they began a British branch of the Old Girls Association.

The leaders of the school at mid-century were a combination of new blood and long-time members of the community. Miss Helen Millichamp, a Canadian with a B.A. from Oxford and an M.A. from Cambridge, became Principal in 1948. She had experience teaching in several acclaimed schools in England and Scotland, and launched a $200,000 fundraising campaign in 1949 to retire the school’s debt and raise money for teachers’ pensions. In 1952, Miss Grace Macnaughton, a Scot with an M.A. in English from the University of Edinburgh, a teaching certificate from Cambridge University, and a member of the BSS staff since 1924, succeeded her. Miss Joan Griffith was appointed Headmistress in 1958. A third-generation BSS student, Miss Griffith had also been a staff member, serving as Head of the Science Department and a Vice-Principal.

These were prosperous times. The school was on sound financial footing with an enrolment of close to 500 students in 1962, 128 of whom were boarders. Public interest in space exploration brought increasing focus on science and the activities offered to the girls continued to proliferate. Other developments reflected the maturing institution: in 1955, The Bishop Strachan School Foundation was incorporated as a vehicle for endowment in order to meet the increasing needs for scholarships and capital fund; a short history of the school was published in 1948; and in 1958, the BSS Association (Old Girls) celebrated its 50th Anniversary.

1962-1995: INTO THE SCHOOL’S SECOND CENTURY

From 1962-68, Miss Betty Nicks headed the school. She was headed to becoming the first woman Principal of a public high school in Winnipeg, but was convinced to join BSS instead. Miss Nicks introduced the first full-time Chaplain to BSS, Canon E.R. Bagley, and also launched a building program that would add new classrooms, a large music room and the first modern double gymnasium. The North (or New) Wing was opened in 1966, in time for the school’s centennial celebrations. In 1967, the school replaced its annual school magazine with a yearbook (Prism) and celebrated its centennial with a pageant, and special historical insert in the BSS Bulletin and Prism. The choir, recognized for its excellence since the 1950s, was chosen to sing at Expo 67 in Montreal.

BSS Long History | TOC

In 1969, BSS welcomed its first and, to date only, Headmaster, Mr. Edward (Ted) Jarvis. A former teacher at Trinity College School, UCC and Forest Hill Collegiate, Mr. Jarvis brought a range of experience to the job. By his tenure, attitudes about social etiquette were changing and at BSS, uniform rules were relaxed and the Chapel veil was dispensed with, much to the consternation of the Old Girls Association. Rules in what had been a very structured residence life were also loosened and day girls and boarders had considerably more control over their own activities.

In 1970, declining enrolment in the Junior School caused classes from Kindergarten to Grade 4 to be cancelled. The Board realized that a strong elementary program was a critical foundation for the school’s strength and took steps to revitalize it. Mrs. Zena Firth was appointed Principal of the Junior School and boys were brought in to the Junior grades for the first time since Miss Lowe’s time.

Miss Katherine Wicks became Headmistress in 1976. A graduate of University of Toronto with a Masters in English, she had held several teaching posts at both secondary and university levels, including Associate Professor at the Faculty of Education of the University of Windsor and, at the time of her appointment, was working on her Ph.D. In her tenure, she improved academic salaries, introduced more guidance services for students, reorganized administrative and admission systems, tightened school rules and brought about curriculum change, such as the introduction of courses in typing and computers and the phasing out of home economics.

The dominant Head of School of the late twentieth century was Miss Ann Tottenham, who was appointed in 1981 and served until 1995. A graduate of the University of Toronto, where she won the Governor General’s Medal, she also completed a Bachelor of Sacred Theology at Trinity College and a Master of Sacred Theology at Union Theological Seminary in New York, and a Bachelor of Education at the University of Toronto. She was ordained to the priesthood in 1983 and became the first ordained Headmistress in Canada. The Chapel continued to play an important role in school life. Services were in the Anglican tradition, but respect for other faiths and knowledge about them were taught in the classroom and throughout school life. Miss Tottenham appointed two female Chaplains over her fifteen-year tenure, appointments which would not have been possible in the past.

Under Miss Tottenham, the curriculum was expanded. Advanced Placement courses were introduced, and the use of technology increased, all of which required more space. In 1983, the science facilities were updated with four labs outfitted with state-of-the-art equipment. This period saw a major change in the incorporation of technology. Computer Science was introduced in 1981-82, the school’s administration began using a computer system in 1985, and in 1991 two Macintosh computer labs were added.

BSS Long History

Additionally, a major new wing was planned and what was then a major fundraising campaign for $4.5 million was launched. The resulting Rogers Wing opened in 1987-88, providing new Senior School and Junior School library space, more classrooms, and a new theatre for lectures, plays, and musical performances. It was also in Miss Tottenham’s time that the school celebrated its 125th anniversary with multiple events, including a gala concert at Roy Thomson Hall.

1995 - PRESENT: DAWN OF THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

When Miss Tottenham retired in 1995, Natalie Little joined BSS as Head, and during her energetic tenure, she led the way on two strategic plans that harnessed the skills of the faculty, staff and administration to push the school forward on myriad fronts, particularly in the area of technology. The students who entered Grade 9 in September 1999 were the first BSS students to graduate under the new Ontario four-year high school program that had eliminated Grade 13 and the first to use laptops as a key curricular tool in their academic program. Ms. Little also led an extremely successful capital campaign that raised over $14.5 million for the construction of the 90,000 sq. ft. Warren Road Wing, with a spacious, purpose-built Junior School, a second gym, a dance studio, and other fitness facilities.

When Natalie Little retired in 2004, Kim Gordon (2004-2009) became Head of School, and in this period developments were made to both the physical plant and the BSS program, and a new strategic plan was launched with the three guiding planks of People, Program and Sustainability. With the support of the BSS community, a beautiful new Student Centre was constructed and opened in the spring of 2007. In 2008, the library was renovated into a state-of-the-art Learning Commons, and Centennial Hall, celebrating 100 years of the BSS Old Girls’ Association, was installed. In addition, many improvements were made to the Boarding facilities. Under Ms. Gordon’s leadership, the Reggio approach to learning was solidified in the Junior School and a distinct Middle School program, designed specifically to meet the needs of students transitioning from Junior to Senior School, began to be developed.

After Ms. Gordon’s retirement in 2009, Deryn Lavell, previously BSS’s Junior School Principal and Assistant Head of International Programs and Institutional Advancement, took over as Head of School. For two years, between her role as Junior School Principal and returning to BSS, Ms. Lavell had lived and worked in Dubai and Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates, where she designed, built and opened a new school with an enrolment of 1,300 students. This international experience taught her about the reality of life for girls in other cultures, our global connectedness, and the multiple skills required to effectively run a school. She brought these insights to her role as Head and immediately launched a comprehensive review of the school’s status with regard to its Strategic Plan, its communications with parents, the skill sets required by faculty and the pursuit of a vision that would see BSS make the final leap into a fully integrated, 21st Century learning environment.

BSS Long History | TOC

The Strategic Vision, as set out in Focus BSS, called for an expansion of the inquiry approach and a seamless transition among the various life stages of students, culminating in a Culture of Powerful Learning from JK to Grade 12. The appointment of a Principal of the Middle School in September 2015 formalized the status of Grades 7 and 8 as a separate entity in the school, a trend that had been developing since Ms. Gordon’s time.

In addition, in 2014, the school embarked on Intersection, a major campaign of $35 million that included a $20 million Campus Renewal Fund. The campus on the Russell Hill Road side will house a series of flexible learning spaces, encouraging art to intersect with science, breaking down barriers among disciplines, and fostering an integrated approach to understanding problems. Also part of this campaign are the $10 million Community fund to bolster financial assistance, and the $5 million Innovation fund investing in teacher development.

In September 2016, BSS began its year-long celebration of 150 years of existence and introduced a new mission statement: Inspire girls to be fearless. Educate girls to be leaders. It is immensely proud of its heritage as a Canadian school as old as Confederation and of its current position among the leading girls’ schools in North America. BSS knows how its 900 girls, Junior Kindergarten to Grade 12, learn and knows they can do anything.

Rendering of new building to open in 2017
Opening Warren Road 2004
Junior School 2004
Turning of the sod for Rogers wing 1987
Laying the cornerstone for new wing 1965

BSS Long History

Lasting Legacy Profiles

Viola ALLEN 1878

Who was the first BSS student to appear in a film? It seems to be Viola Allen, who attended BSS in the 1870s and went on to become a famous stage actress. In 1915, she starred in an early silent film entitled The White Sister, the first of three movie versions of this story adapted from a 1909 popular novel.

One of a surprising number of American students attending BSS in its early days, Allen was born in Alabama, the daughter of actors. In 1882, just shy of fifteen years, she made her debut on Broadway, appearing with her father in Esmeralda. She went on to have a long career in modern and classic drama, with her portrayals of Shakespearean heroines winning particular acclaim. In 1903, Allen established her own company dedicated to Shakespearean productions, and when it toured to Toronto, BSS girls were taken to see her, being charged $1.25 for their tickets.

According to the New York Times, “Well-trained, technically gifted and with considerable emotional range, she was for many lovers of plays the ideal heroine of a romantic age” (as quoted in the BSS Bulletin of 1948). Allen’s last major production was 1916 and she died in 1948, leaving a large collection of theatre memorabilia to the Museum of the City of New York.

The film of The White Sister appears to be lost, but Youtube gives a link to a recording Allen made of Portia in The Merchant of Venice in 1940 at the age of seventy.

Lasting Legacy Profiles | TOC

Viola Allen Actress
Viola Allen in Twelfth Night
Viola Allen in The White Sister
Viola Allen Actress
Viola Allen Actress

Lasting Legacy Profiles

Maud EDGAR 1888

Naturally there were plenty of teachers among the early graduates of BSS, a few of whom, like Sara Nation, Ianthe Constantinides and Helen Macdonald returned to Wykeham Hall, and others, like Beulah Starkie Fernley and Ethel Middleton, who moved on to lead other schools. The only known woman of this era, however, to co-found a new girls’ school was Maud Edgar, who attended BSS from 1885-1888 and who graduated with an Honours degree in Modern Languages from the University of Toronto in 1896. Miss Edgar (left) is captured in this portrait with Miss Mary Cramp, co-founder of the school.

The daughter of politically engaged parents (her mother was a feminist activist, as well as historian and writer, and her father a Speaker of the House of Commons) Edgar taught for a time at Havergal College. With a fellow Havergal staff member, she established Miss Edgar’s and Miss Cramp’s School (ECS) in Montreal in 1909 with seventy day girls and fifteen boarders. The two led the school until her retirement in 1940. 107 years later, the Montreal independent school continues to flourish.

Lasting Legacy Profiles | TOC

Harriet Mary FORD 1878

Orphaned at the age of ten, Harriet Ford attended BSS for eight years (1870-78), winning the Senior Drawing Prize in her final year. She trained in Toronto, London and Paris and became a talented artist in many media. She painted oils and watercolours, executed murals, posters and stained glass, did book cover illustration, created jewellery, and wrote and lectured on art.

Ford believed that Canadian artists should be free to paint non-Canadian subjects so travelled widely and lived intermittently between Toronto and Buckinghamshire, England. A reference in the BSS Bulletin of 1939 reports that a French Canadian woman with whom she lodged on a painting trip was disturbed that she “was so very daring as to smoke a cigarette after dinner.” Ford was the first of many BSS girls to win distinction in the art world. She has works in the National Gallery of Canada, The Art Gallery of Ontario and the Art Gallery of Hamilton.

Lasting Legacy Profiles

Emily FERGUSON Murphy 1885

Who is the only BSS former student with a statue on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, her name on a plaque in the Senate, and her picture on the 2004 Canadian $50.00 bill and a 1985 stamp? It is, of course, Emily FERGUSON Murphy who, as one of five determined women (the “Famous Five”) pushed forward the “Persons Case” until its successful conclusion in 1929. That year, the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council in London, at the time the last court of appeal for laws governing Canadians, ruled that women were indeed “persons” in the eyes of the British North America Act, meaning that Canadian females could now be appointed to roles formerly denied them, including serving as senators. It was a significant victory for women’s rights in the country and Murphy was the chief moving force.

Murphy had attended BSS as a boarder from Cookstown between 1882-1885 before marrying and moving west, first to Manitoba and then to Alberta where the family settled in Edmonton. Under the pseudonym Janey Canuck, she authored popular books about her impressions of the underside of industrialism and urban blight in London, England and about pioneering life in the Canadian West. Feminist causes soon gained her attention and she became active in social and legal reform, including the campaign for the 1911 Alberta Dower Act that recognized the property rights of a married woman. Her appointment as a police court magistrate in Edmonton, the result of her activism, made her the first female magistrate in the British Empire, a role to which she brought great energy and commitment. It was the objection of some men to her judicial appointment that launched her on the long campaign of the “Persons” Case.

Murphy was active in the other great political cause of her day: pushing for the extension of the vote to women. She hosted British suffragette Emmeline Pankhurst on her visit to Canada, was at the forefront of the Equal Franchise League’s efforts to initiate change through a massive petition and in 1915 along with Nellie McClung, directly lobbied the Alberta premier to allow female suffrage.

Lasting Legacy Profiles | TOC

Modern Canadians are much easier with Murphy’s achievements on behalf of women than they are with her vigorous campaign against narcotics, her enthusiasm for eugenics, and the way she expressed views about races other than her own. Writing in The Canadian Encyclopedia, Anthony Wilson Smith sums up her current reputation this way:

“Murphy’s achievement [in the cause of female equality] also stands in contrast to her views on other issues – such as her opposition to non-white immigration and her support of eugenics, a pseudo scientific study of hereditary issues. The views she expressed on those topics are now clearly offensive and outside of mainstream attitudes – and justifiably and negatively affect the way she is remembered. But her achievements on behalf of women remain indisputable -- and to the benefit of all.”

Remembered by BSS schoolmates as brainy, organized and fearless, Murphy took her talents and stamina into the public sphere – long before many Canadian women did.

Lasting Legacy Profiles

Miriam GREEN Ellis 1896

Image courtesy of Bruce Peel
Special Collections & Archives,
University of Alberta

Born in 1879, Miriam GREEN Ellis (or MGE, as she called herself) attended BSS in 1895-6 before going on to study at the Toronto Conservatory and then teaching music near her home in Eastern Ontario. After a move to Western Canada in 1904 she became a journalist for newspapers in Prince Albert, Regina, Edmonton, and in 1927 joined the widely read Family Herald and Weekly Star as Western Editor for 25 years. She was also the manager of one of Canada’s first female hockey teams in Western Canada in 1912. This early and very successful female agricultural journalist was an adventurous traveller who, in 1922, once took an unpaid leave to travel north by train, car and river steamer to Aklavik, NWT, documenting her findings with photographs and a diary.

 

 

To find out more about this fascinating BSS Old Girl, visit this University of Alberta website focused on her or read a collection of her writings published in 2013, Travels and Tales of Miriam Green Ellis: Pioneer Journalist of the Canadian West. Edited by Patricia Demers.

Lasting Legacy Profiles | TOC

Violet NESBITT 1895

Of the group of BSS students who served overseas in World War I, Violet Nesbitt was one of the remarkable women who joined early, had a senior position in hospitals as a matron in France and England and did not return from overseas until 1919. A boarder from Smith Falls, she attended BSS from 1891 to Christmas 1895, trained as a nurse in the United States, and, by World War I, already had war experience. She was part of a group of twelve Canadian Nursing Sisters who sailed overseas to serve in the South African War (formerly known as the Boer War).

Thirteen years later, at the age of 36, she embarked with the first Canadian Contingent that left Canada in September 1914 and over the next five years as part of the Canadian Army Medical Corps she was the matron at General Hospitals 1 (Étaples, France) and 9 (Shorncliffe, England).

At a ceremony in February, 1917, she was awarded the Royal Red Cross Medal, First Class by King George V. By August 1919, she had returned to Canada and in the 1920s became a naturalized American citizen, nursing in New York City. The valuable and little-known contributions of other BSS students who served as nurses in World War I is highlighted in the March 2017 issue of The Link.

Lasting Legacy Profiles

Elizabeth MONTIZAMBERT 1893

One BSS girl of this era was born in the Citadel in Quebec City, where her father later became the commandant and she grew up to become a journalist, regularly filing stories to Montreal papers from France and England. Elizabeth (known as Elsie) Montizambert attended BSS for five years, graduating in 1893 and then going on to become one of the school’s early university graduates. She earned her degree from Trinity University (now Trinity College, University of Toronto) in 1896 in Modern Languages.

She moved to Europe with her mother and sisters, one of whom, Beatrice, became well known for her artistic skills as a miniaturist. Elizabeth Montizambert’s family were well-to-do, but she resolved to make her name as a journalist. By 1912, she had moved to Paris and was writing stories for Montreal papers on culture, art, and fashion under various names, including the pseudonyms Elizabeth Le Boucher and Antoinette. Fluent in French, by Christmas 1915 she was serving alongside French support staff in the war effort, working out of boxcars to provide and serve food to French soldiers being evacuated to hospitals from the front lines (BSS Magazine Christmas, 1915).

In the Twenties, Elsie published books for adults and children about London’s historic places, and, based on her expertise, was selected to author a six-penny booklet called “London Adventure” issued under the auspices of London Transport. She continued to write a “London Letter’ for The Montreal Gazette during World War II.

For those interested in learning more about Montizambert, she is featured in a book entitled, Firing Lines: Three Canadian Women Write the First World War by Debbie Marshall, a book with a planned publication date of 2017.


The following page is an excerpt from Marshall's piece Special correspondents: not all the reporters covering World War One were men courtesy of Free Library.

Lasting Legacy Profiles | TOC

The three women weren't objective reporters in the modern sense of the word. All had military connections. Elizabeth had been raised in Quebec's Citadel, the daughter of a Canadian military officer who had fought Riel at Fish Creek and Batoche. Mary's late father had been an Anglo-Irish officer who had retired in Canada. Her brother William was an officer in the Canadian Expeditionary Force and had been wounded on the Somme. "(A)nd his sister would like to go too if they took women!" she wrote to a friend. Beatrice Nasmyth was the daughter of a Woodstock druggist, but was engaged to an officer in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.

Yet, despite their military ties and belief in the Allied cause, Moore, Montizambert, and Nasmyth--for the most part--offered an honest, fresh, and compelling account of the war. Writing from England and France, they would record the impact of food shortages on civilians and soldiers alike, the struggle to get supplies to the front, the terror produced by the first air raids on London and Paris, the work of military nurses, women doctors and ambulance drivers, as well as intimate accounts of life at the front from returning and wounded soldiers.

Naturally, Montizambert was the only one of the three to regularly get close to the front. One of the ways she did this was to volunteer with some of the canteens sponsored by the French press. These were boxcars attached to ambulance trains. They were miniature kitchens, stocked with extra food and provisions (socks, cigarettes, etc.) for distribution to the wounded. The French troops were notoriously underfed and the free bread, meat, and coffee the volunteers served up strengthened many of the men being transported back from the front lines. In December 1915, Elizabeth was working in Verdun and filed this description of her experience:

"On an average we travel every four days and we feed a hundred wounded on each trip. One of us takes the badly wounded on the stretchers to attend to, and the other the semi-invalids who can sit up in the ordinary railway carriages ... It seems sometimes as one looks at them that no amount of spoiling could possibly be too much. In front of those mangled limbs and brave faces we have only one thought--to make the few hours we are with them as bearable as possible. When we get back to Verdun some of them are taken to the town hospitals and the majority go on by another train to Bar-le-duc ...

"[Back in Verdun] we went up to hear mass in the old cathedral. The service was nearly over when the organ was interrupted by an appalling crash that made the stained glass windows rattle. No one paid the least attention. I suppose the Verdunoise scorn to notice anything smaller than long-distance guns. The little acolyte serving the mass looked round and grinned broadly at some of his pals in the congregation, but no one else stirred. As soon as the service was over we hurried back to the station, certain that it had been the centre of attraction. We had missed seeing a bomb fall only fifty yards from our car..."

Lasting Legacy Profiles

Daisy POCOCK 1888 (Lena Ashwell)

“I had always longed that artists might have their proper recognition as a great arm of National Service. In our professional capacity we might be as much use and as real a necessity as the Red Cross or St. John’s Ambulance, for does not the soul of man need as much help as his body?”

from Modern Troubadour by Lena Ashwell ,1922)

So wrote a woman who had been a school girl called Daisy Pocock at BSS in the 1880s and who went on to acquire several adult names and to distinguish herself in many ways. Lena Ashwell was the professional stage name she chose in 1891 and Lady Simson became another name after her eminent Scottish obstetrician husband, Henry Simson, was knighted.


Born on a vessel moored on the Tyne River in England and English by birth, Pocock came to Canada with her family as a child, settling first on the St Lawrence River in eastern Ontario and then moving to Toronto. She was both a day girl and a boarder at BSS, finishing with the university preparation class in 1888. She and her sisters left Canada with their widowed father shortly after the accidental and premature death of her mother, and after a brief sojourn in Switzerland, she moved to London. There, after impressing the famous actress Ellen Terry, she began to act on the London stage and in touring companies, achieving particular acclaim for her portrayal of troubled women.

Ahead of her time in many ways, Ashwell was an actress-manager of a theatre in 1907-8, lobbied the British Prime Minister about changes needed to the Married Women’s Property Act, and, as a member of the Actresses’ Franchise League, was involved in the women’s suffrage movement.

Lasting Legacy Profiles | TOC

In World War I, Ashwell became the key figure in organizing entertainments (or “concert parties”) for troops, initially in their base camps and in the hospitals. Passionate about the impact of music and poetry on the wounded, the weary and the traumatized, she functioned as both a performer and a coordinator of the multiple groups of touring musicians and actors. In her tours to France, she sometimes encountered former BSS students serving at the front and she also received grateful letters from men whose mothers had known her at Wykeham Hall in Toronto. The scale of the venture was impressive: the concert parties travelled as far as Malta and Cairo, and by 1916 some groups had even expanded their reach into the front lines, although these featured only male performers. At war’s end Ashwell could report that in France alone twenty-five performing groups were giving fifty different entertainments a day (Myself a Player 194). Ashwell was awarded an OBE in 1917 for her striking wartime contributions. Post World War I, Ashwell expanded her arts activism as she worked for ten years with London municipal officials, to bring serious live theatre and post-performance discussions to non-traditional theatre audiences. She is generally regarded as an overlooked figure in the long struggle to establish a National Theatre in Britain. Ashwell died in 1957 at the age of 87.

Ashwell was also a prolific author, interested in shaping her public identity. She published four books, the last of which, Myself a Player (1932), includes her memories of days at Wykeham Hall. A remarkable woman, Ashwell has been the subject of a full-length biography by Margaret Leask (2012) and her career has also attracted other scholarly interest.

Further reading may be found in:

Collins, L. J. Theatre at War. Basingstoke, Hampshire: MacMillan, 1998. 147-176.

Gale, Maggie B. “Lena Ashwell and Auto/Biographical Negotiations of the Professional Self.” Auto/Biography and Identity: women, theatre and performance. Ed. Maggie B. Gale and Viv Gardner. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2004. 99-125.

Hirschfield, Claire. “The Actress as Social Activist: the Case of Lena Ashwell.” Politics, Gender and the Arts: Women, the Arts and Society. Ed. Ronald Dotterer and Susan Bowers. London and Toronto: Susquehanna University Press, 1992. 72-86.

Leask, Margaret. Lena Ashwell: actress, patriot, pioneer. Hatfield, Hertfordshire: University of Hertfordshire Press/The Society for Theatre Research, 2012.

Lasting Legacy Profiles

Marjorie PICKETHALL 1901

Portrait of Marjorie Pickthall from
the frontispiece of The Wood Carver's
Wife and Later Poems, published
posthumously in 1922.

“I am getting on pretty well at school. I whack all of them in composition.” So wrote Marjorie Pickthall in her 1897 diary. Two years later, when she began attending BSS, she was still “whacking” the other students at composition!

The name of this former student is well known in the BSS Community, since, from 1925, a creative writing competition with her name has been held annually at the school, with prizes given by the Old Girls. Almost a hundred years after her death, Pickthall remains the most prolific creative author that the school has produced: she published over 200 stories, approximately 100 poems and a number of novels.

Pickthall, born in England in 1883 and resident in Toronto from 1889, was a day girl who attended BSS from 1899-1902, although her fragile health meant that she was often absent. While still a BSS student, she sold her first story to The Globe (payment-- $3.00!), and shortly after won two first prizes in the Christmas competition held by another newspaper, The Mail and Empire. As an adult writer, Pickthall’s work was much admired, with the musicality of the poetry often emphasized. She had not only Canadian fans, but, after 1905, literary agents in the US and Britain, with her work appearing in periodicals as varied as Harper’s, The Atlantic, Saturday Night, McCall’s, and the London Illustrated News.

After a period living in England from 1912-20, Pickthall returned to Canada and died prematurely in British Columbia in 1922. In her lifetime and for sometime later she had a leading place in the canon of early twentieth century Canadian poetry, but, as tastes changed, her work fell into the shadows. Recently, her writing has been re-examined by feminist critics and, in the words of Barbara Godard writing in The Canadian Encyclopedia, revealed “to be more complex than her legacy had hitherto suggested.”

For a more detailed account of Pickthall’s life and her changing reputation in Canadian literature, please see the following articles on Pickthall:

Lasting Legacy Profiles | TOC

Marching Men

By Marjorie Pickthall

Under the level winter sky
I saw a thousand Christs go by.
They sang an idle song and free
As they went up to calvary.

Careless of eye and coarse of lip,
They marched in holiest fellowship.
That heaven might heal the world, they gave
Their earth-born dreams to deck the grave.

With souls unpurged and steadfast breath
They supped the sacrament of death.
And for each one, far off, apart,
Seven swords have rent a woman's heart.

Lasting Legacy Profiles

Mary WRINCH 1892

Mary Evelyn Wrinch was, like Harriet Ford, another BSS boarder who went on to lead the life of a successful professional artist. A student at BSS from 1888-1892, she studied at the Central School of Art in Toronto (now known as OCAD University).There she met the artist George A. Reid whom she would marry much later in 1922, after the death of his first wife. She continued her studies of visual arts in London and at the Art Students League in New York City, specializing at that time in miniature painting on ivory. By 1901 she had been elected a member of the Ontario Society of Artists, and in 1916 she became a member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts. She exhibited in the 1924 British Empire exhibit in 1924, and at many group shows, including at the Art Gallery of Toronto, the Tate, London and the New York City World’s Fair.

Mary E. Wrinch, the professional name she preferred, began as a miniaturist, but moved to oils, including figure paintings and landscapes done in the Muskoka region. After 1928 she worked almost exclusively as a printmaker, producing both black and white and exquisite colour linotypes, and bringing that enthusiasm for the form to her teaching. As a BSS student M. Smith of 1929 put it:

“When Christmas nears it’s time to think
Of cards to cut from lino-tiles,
A noisome smell of printers ink
Surrounds the Studio for miles."

Mary E. Wrinch had a long association with BSS, combining her own career with teaching art at the school two afternoons a week for thirty-five years from 1901-1936. A notice at the time of her retirement remarked on her “quiet unassuming manner” and “the keen personal interest” that she always took in her BSS pupils as she encouraged them to develop their own creativity. She was responsible for bringing loan exhibitions of oil paintings and prints to the Great Hall and the beautiful art studio on the third floor of the current Lonsdale building still bears the mark of her design. The school is proud to possess two of her miniatures done of former Lady Principals, Miss Grier and Miss Acres, as well as two oils, a large and striking landscape and a rendering of the Chapel sanctuary.

In 1969, Wrinch’s work was the focus of a solo exhibition at the Art Gallery of Ontario and in 2012 the Art Gallery of Windsor mounted a show about her work in their collection, accompanied by a small catalogue.

Lasting Legacy Profiles | TOC

For those interested in learning more about Wrinch and the museums and galleries holding her work, there is a useful summary at the Canadian Women Artists History Initiative.

Lasting Legacy Profiles

1869 Prospectus

This, the earliest BSS Prospectus, outlines the reasons for the school’s founding and the history of its earliest years. It lists the members of the school’s Council (Board of Governors), the teaching staff, Bursar and school physician. The “Objects” and “General Regulations”, “Course of Study”, fee schedule and a list of pupils can also be found in this document.

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1869 Prospectus

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1869 Prospectus

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1869 Prospectus

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1869 Prospectus

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1869 Prospectus

1882 Jane COLDWELL Album

Phoebe Jane COLDWELL (known as Jane) attended the Wykeham Hall location of BSS as a boarder from Constance, Ontario in the 1881-1882 school year. Jane wrote down the details of her life at BSS in verse in a small hard-covered book she titled, "BSS. Room XV and scraps of other Rooms". Both the poetic descriptions and the attractive highly detailed drawings, some hand-coloured, in all covering 60 pages, reveal a remarkable artistic talent. The book was passed down in Jane's family until it was donated to the University of Toronto's Fisher Rare Book Collection in 1999. A scanned copy was donated to the BSS Museum & Archives that same year.

A selection of pages from Phoebe’s album are seen here with the kind permission of the Fisher Rare Book Collection.

1882 Jane COLDWELL Album | TOC

1882 Jane COLDWELL Album

1882 Jane COLDWELL Album

1882 Jane COLDWELL Album | TOC

1882 Jane COLDWELL Album

1882 Jane COLDWELL Album

1882 Jane COLDWELL Album | TOC

1882 Jane COLDWELL Album

1882 Jane COLDWELL Album

1882 Jane COLDWELL Album | TOC

1882 Jane COLDWELL Album

1882 Jane COLDWELL Album

1882 Jane COLDWELL Album | TOC

1882 Jane COLDWELL Album

1882 Jane COLDWELL Album

1882 Jane COLDWELL Album | TOC

1882 Jane COLDWELL Album

1882 Jane COLDWELL Album | TOC

1882 Jane COLDWELL Album | TOC

1882 Jane COLDWELL Album

1889 Maud OXNARD Album

Maud OXNARD was a boarder from Guelph, Ontario who attended the Wykeham Hall location of BSS for four years from 1885-1889. It was the fashion for girls at this time to keep such an album of poems, sketches and messages from their friends and the BSS Museum & Archives has eight such albums in our collection. Maud’s album is unique in the number and variety of sketches and drawings, many of them humorous caricatures of BSS students and teachers. It also contains pressed flowers, a BSS “Soiree Musicale” programme and small watercolour paintings.

In the photograph on the following page from her last year at BSS, Maud has been identified as girl number six.

1889 Maud OXNARD Album | TOC

1889 Maud OXNARD Album

1889 Maud OXNARD Album | TOC

1889 Maud OXNARD Album

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1889 Maud OXNARD Album

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1889 Maud OXNARD Album

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1889 Maud OXNARD Album

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1889 Maud OXNARD Album

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1889 Maud OXNARD Album

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1889 Maud OXNARD Album

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1889 Maud OXNARD Album

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1889 Maud OXNARD Album

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1889 Maud OXNARD Album

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1889 Maud OXNARD Album

1889 Maud OXNARD Album | TOC

1889 Maud OXNARD Album

1889 Maud OXNARD Album | TOC

1889 Maud OXNARD Album

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter

This is the earliest existing school publication handwritten and illustrated by staff and students.

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Easter

1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas

Earliest printed issue of a school publication. The BSS Magazine continued to be published three times a year until 1910. From then it was published twice yearly (with Christmas and Midsummer editions) until 1936 when it began to be published only once a year at "midsummer". The last issue was in 1966. The "BSS Magazine" was replaced by the yearbook, the "Prism" in 1967.

1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas

1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas

1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas

1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas

1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas

1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas

1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas

1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas | TOC

1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas

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1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas

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1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas

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1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas

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1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas

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1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas

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1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas

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1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas

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1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas

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1904 BSS Magazine, Christmas

1905 BSS Magazine, Easter

“Reminiscences of Early Days at the BSS” by Minnie COTTINGHAM, a student who entered BSS in 1869.

1905 BSS Magazine, Easter | TOC

1905 BSS Magazine, Easter

1905 BSS Magazine, Easter | TOC

1905 BSS Magazine, Easter

1905 BSS Magazine, Midsummer

The origins of The Bishop Strachan School as penned by John Langtry himself.

1905 BSS Magazine, Midsummer | TOC

1905 BSS Magazine, Midsummer

1905 BSS Magazine, Midsummer | TOC

1905 BSS Magazine, Midsummer

1909 The BSS Song

"The BSS Song" was written in 1908 and copyrighted the following year by Louisa Nelson ROBERTSON. She dedicated it to Kiku Waller, a fellow student, "and to all loyal pupils of the Bishop Strachan School past, present and future". Louisa Robertson was a day student who attended BSS for three years from 1905-1908.

1909 The BSS Song | TOC

1909 The BSS Song

1909 The BSS Song | TOC

1909 The BSS Song

1909 The BSS Song | TOC

1909 The BSS Song

1917 BSS Magazine, Midsummer

The memories of four Old Girls were published on the occasion of the school's 50th anniversary in 1917.
  • “Some Memories of the Early Days of The Bishop Strachan School” by Charlotte SHAW, a student who entered in 1868.
  • “Reminiscences of BSS Days Under Miss Grier in the Early Eighties” by Harriet PATTON 1884
  • “Reminiscences” by Edith MARLING Balfour 1877-1880.
  • The memories of Ethel ELLIS Crooks 1894.

1917 BSS Magazine, Midsummer | TOC

1917 BSS Magazine, Midsummer

1917 BSS Magazine, Midsummer | TOC

1917 BSS Magazine, Midsummer

1917 BSS Magazine, Midsummer | TOC

1917 BSS Magazine, Midsummer

1917 BSS Magazine, Midsummer | TOC

1917 BSS Magazine, Midsummer

1917 BSS Magazine, Midsummer | TOC

1917 BSS Magazine, Midsummer

1917 BSS Magazine, Midsummer | TOC

1917 BSS Magazine, Midsummer

1927 Bulletin of the BSSA

Memories of Helen GRANT Armour, a student of the 1870s.

1927 Bulletin of the BSSA | TOC

1927 Bulletin of the BSSA

1927 Bulletin of the BSSA | TOC

1927 Bulletin of the BSSA

1928 Bulletin of the BSSA

“Bits of History” written by Carolyn ROBERTS 1873 and Madge BURBIDGE Ormsby 1894.

1928 Bulletin of the BSSA | TOC

1928 Bulletin of the BSSA

1928 Bulletin of the BSSA | TOC

1928 Bulletin of the BSSA

1939 The Bulletin, Summer

“When Young Ladies Learned the Polka” by Grace WILLIAMS 1878.

1939 The Bulletin, Summer | TOC

1939 The Bulletin, Summer

1939 The Bulletin, Summer | TOC

1939 The Bulletin, Summer

1940 Prospectus

The prospectus, usually updated every few years, advertised and described the Bishop Strachan School for prospective parents. This version, however, replaced the 1927 document after a long period of Depression-era cost-saving measures. It describes Junior, Middle and Senior School required curricula and "special courses"; facilities such as the library, tennis courts, science laboratories and art studio; as well as Day School and House "arrangements."

1940 Prospectus | TOC

1940 Prospectus

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1940 Prospectus

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1940 Prospectus

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1940 Prospectus

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1940 Prospectus

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1940 Prospectus

1958 Prospectus

This prospectus marks the beginning of Miss Joan Griffith's tenure as Head of School and was used until 1967. This version is similar in content to the 1942 Prospectus, but incorporates updated photographs of the school's facilities and the students in action, as well as new philosophies of teaching and discipline.

1958 Prospectus | TOC

1958 Prospectus

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1958 Prospectus

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1958 Prospectus

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1958 Prospectus

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1958 Prospectus

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1958 Prospectus

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1958 Prospectus

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1958 Prospectus

1958 Prospectus | TOC

1958 Prospectus

1958 Prospectus | TOC

See an article in The Link magazine's fall 2017 edition on the
BSS Museum & Archives Department.

1958 Prospectus

The Bishop Strachan School Jubilee Record 1867-1927

Compiled by Headmistress Miss Harriet Walsh, this small book was published as a part of the school's 60th anniversary celebrations. It contains a history of the school, and highlights past headmistresses, chaplains, secretary-bursars, "benefactors and friends" of the school. It proudly describes the new chapel, dedicated the year before in 1926. The book concludes with a description of the current school's "societies" (clubs), "distinctions" gained by past pupils and accounts of "distinguished visitors".

Jubilee Record 1867-1927 | TOC

Jubilee Record 1867-1927

Jubilee Record 1867-1927 | TOC

Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

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Jubilee Record 1867-1927

The Bishop Strachan School Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

The two publications, The BSS Magazine and The Bulletin of the BSSA were combined for a joint celebration of the school's seventy-fifth anniversary. It was also felt that running one issue would "effect economy of funds and labour" in war time. The school's history is covered in both text and photographs and in a special article describes BSS in three wars: the "Boer War", WW1 and WW2. The many alumnae involved in war work are given extensive coverage. Events from the 1942-1943 school year are also covered and include the Drama Club's plays, new Household Science Room, the school's Guide Company and Games Club's sports results.

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

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Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

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Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

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Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

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Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

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Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

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Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

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Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943 | TOC

Magazine & Bulletin 75 Years 1943

Drama Slideshow 1915-1964

The period 1915-1964 was rich with dramatic productions. The Drama Club was organized in 1920 and plays were regularly performed by all levels in the school and also by the boarders for their own amusement. This collection includes some of the photographs and programmes from the BSS Museum & Archives collection.

Click the top image to begin the slideshow of photographs; the bottom image to view the programmes. Captions will be shown at the bottom left. Click the arrows on the right and left side of the image to go forward or backward. Click on the "X" in the top right to close the slideshow. You may view all images as thumbnails by clicking on the grid icon in the top right.

Please note that the flipbook should not be in fullscreen mode before starting the slide show.

Drama Slideshow 1915-1964 | TOC

Drama Slideshow 1915-1964

WW2 BSS Veterans Slideshow

More than 160 alumnae of the school have been identified as serving with the Canadian, British or American services during the war, including the Canadian Red Cross Corps. Many others worked or volunteered in other support capacities. This collection includes some of the photographs, news clippings and memorabilia from the BSS Museum & Archives collection that relates to these women.

Click the image to begin the slideshow. Captions will be shown at the bottom left. Click the arrows on the right and left side of the image to go forward or backward. Click on the "X" in the top right to close the slideshow. You may view all images as thumbnails by clicking on the grid icon in the top right.

Please note that the flipbook should not be in fullscreen mode before starting the slide show.

WW2 BSS Veterans Slideshow | TOC

WW2 BSS Veterans Slideshow

We are grateful to Old Girls and their families who have donated valuable photographs, letters and artifacts to the BSS Museum & Archives. Their stories are the fabric of our proud past.

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